News Reviews Quizzes Lists
Login
My Garage
New hero

DVLA Drivers Should Exchange Blue V5C Log Books For Red

By Stephen Turvil | June 2, 2014

Share

Why not leave a comment?

See all | Add a comment

Blue V5C Log Books Stolen

DVLA Drivers Should Exchange Blue V5C Log Books For Red
More On This Car
Take one for a spin or order a brochure
Request a brochure
Request a test drive

The Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency is encouraging motorists that have a blue-coloured V5C Log Book to exchange it for a red one. But why? In 2006, a significant number of blank, blue, certificates were stolen. Reference numbers range from BG8229501 to BG9999030 and BI2305501 to BI2800000. The concern is that a blank certificate – once in the hands of a criminal - could be used to make a stolen or cloned car look more legitimate. After all, a certificate contains a wide range of information such as its registration number, manufacturer, cylinder capacity, chassis number, fuel type, etc. The criminal could simply add whatever information suits. The Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency, therefore, replaced its blue certificate to minimise risk to the trade and buyers/sellers - so the red equivalent has been issued with new cars for some time. Furthermore, motorists with old cars have received the upgrade when applying for changes to the registration, such as a new address. However, there are still some that have the old-style blue certificate. That could alienate and alarm potential buyers. The Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency, after all, advises a buyer to reject a car with a blue certificate unless the owner upgrades it to red. This process is simple and free of charge.

Buying A Car: Checking a V5C Log Book

Now, some car buyers assume that a V5C Log Book is proof of ownership. It is not. It simply “shows who is responsible for registering and taxing the vehicle”. This is clearly explained on the red certificate. A buyer should, therefore, look for further proof that the seller is entitled to dispose of the vehicle – particularly if purchasing privately. Evidence could come via a receipt the owner received when obtaining the vehicle. This should include a name and address that can be cross-referenced with the supplier. The buyer might require seller's permission and cooperation to complete this step. It is also important to examine the V5C to ensure it is legitimate (even if it is red). Check the watermark, for example, and for signs of tampering.  Furthermore, ensure that every detail matches the car such as the vehicle identification number, engine number, registration number, etc. The buyer can also confirm via the internet what information the Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency holds on the vehicle. This includes the date of first registration, year of manufacturer, tax status and when its last V5C Log Book was issued. 

More On This Car
Take one for a spin or order a brochure
Request a brochure
Request a test drive

Related Articles

DVLA bans rude ‘71’ registration plates
Revealed: the new, ‘71’, registration plates that are deemed to be controversial by the DVLA so they have been banned
Oct 19, 2021
Petrol prices close to record high
Petrol prices have almost reached the highest level ever recorded in the UK, according to Government figures.
Oct 19, 2021
Cheese and wine to fuel a DB6? What is the world coming to…
As us regular folk were getting our heads around the introduction of E10 petrol to our pumps, Prince Charles has told the BBC his Aston...
Oct 12, 2021
British cars now need UK stickers in Europe, not GB
British registered vehicles traveling through Europe must now have a UK number plate or sticker, rather than GB
Oct 12, 2021