Login
My Garage
New hero

DVLA Drivers Should Exchange Blue V5C Log Books For Red

By Stephen Turvil | June 2, 2014

Share

Why not leave a comment?

See all | Add a comment

Blue V5C Log Books Stolen

DVLA Drivers Should Exchange Blue V5C Log Books For Red
More On This Car
Take one for a spin or order a brochure
Request a brochure
Request a test drive

The Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency is encouraging motorists that have a blue-coloured V5C Log Book to exchange it for a red one. But why? In 2006, a significant number of blank, blue, certificates were stolen. Reference numbers range from BG8229501 to BG9999030 and BI2305501 to BI2800000. The concern is that a blank certificate – once in the hands of a criminal - could be used to make a stolen or cloned car look more legitimate. After all, a certificate contains a wide range of information such as its registration number, manufacturer, cylinder capacity, chassis number, fuel type, etc. The criminal could simply add whatever information suits. The Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency, therefore, replaced its blue certificate to minimise risk to the trade and buyers/sellers - so the red equivalent has been issued with new cars for some time. Furthermore, motorists with old cars have received the upgrade when applying for changes to the registration, such as a new address. However, there are still some that have the old-style blue certificate. That could alienate and alarm potential buyers. The Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency, after all, advises a buyer to reject a car with a blue certificate unless the owner upgrades it to red. This process is simple and free of charge.

Buying A Car: Checking a V5C Log Book

Now, some car buyers assume that a V5C Log Book is proof of ownership. It is not. It simply “shows who is responsible for registering and taxing the vehicle”. This is clearly explained on the red certificate. A buyer should, therefore, look for further proof that the seller is entitled to dispose of the vehicle – particularly if purchasing privately. Evidence could come via a receipt the owner received when obtaining the vehicle. This should include a name and address that can be cross-referenced with the supplier. The buyer might require seller's permission and cooperation to complete this step. It is also important to examine the V5C to ensure it is legitimate (even if it is red). Check the watermark, for example, and for signs of tampering.  Furthermore, ensure that every detail matches the car such as the vehicle identification number, engine number, registration number, etc. The buyer can also confirm via the internet what information the Driver Vehicle Licensing Agency holds on the vehicle. This includes the date of first registration, year of manufacturer, tax status and when its last V5C Log Book was issued. 

More On This Car
Take one for a spin or order a brochure
Request a brochure
Request a test drive

Related Articles

What is ‘fair wear and tear’ on a lease car’s tyres?
Lease car tyres: there may be a penalty charge if you return a car with poor tyres. The supplier will inspect its tread depth, wear pattern,...
Nov 23, 2022
Millions of road users face higher road tax after latest budget
The changes were announced by Chancellor Jeremy Hunt and will take effect from April 2025
Nov 22, 2022
Audi launches new Q8 e-tron in the UK and it’s the first model to hold the new badge
The Q8 e-tron looks set to achieve big things but many aren’t convinced with the new logo
Nov 22, 2022
Report finds that reducing speed limits to 20mph has virtually no impact on road safety
Research from two universities reveals that the over-the-top speed limits have almost no benefits
Nov 22, 2022